METHODIST TEXSAN HOSPITAL FIRST HOSPITAL IN SAN ANTONIO TO BE AWARDED CHEST PAIN CERTIFICATION FROM THE JOINT COMMISSION

jointcommissionsealMethodist Texsan Hospital, a campus of Methodist Hospital,  today announced it has earned The Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval® for Chest Pain Certification. The Gold Seal of Approval® is a symbol of quality that reflects an organization’s commitment to providing safe and effective patient care.  Methodist Texsan Hospital is the FIRST hospital in San Antonio to receive this award.

Methodist Texsan Hospital underwent a rigorous on-site review on October 20,2015.  Joint Commission experts evaluated compliance with national disease-specific care standards as well as with acute coronary syndrome specific requirements.  Acute coronary syndrome includes:  chest pain or discomfort, which may involve pressure, shortness of breath, lightheadedness, nausea and sweating.

Established in 2002 and awarded for a two-year period, The Joint Commission’s Disease-Specific Care Certification evaluates clinical programs across the continuum of care and addresses three core areas:

  • Compliance with consensus-based national standards;
  • Effective use of evidence-based clinical practice guidelines to manage and optimize care; and
  • An organized approach to performance measurement and improvement activities.

“Methodist Texsan Hospital has thoroughly demonstrated a high level of care for patients with acute coronary syndrome,” said Wendi J. Roberts, RN, executive director, Certification Programs, The Joint Commission. “We commend Methodist Texsan Hospital for becoming a leader in acute coronary syndrome care, potentially providing a higher standard of service for chest pain patients in its community.”

“Methodist Texsan Hospital is pleased to receive Disease-Specific Care Certification from The Joint Commission, the premier health care quality improvement and accrediting body in the nation,” added Scott Davis, CEO for Methodist Texsan Hospital. “The certification provides us with the framework to create a culture of excellence for those in our community.”

 

Dr. Paul Shaughnessy Appointed as Medical Director of Methodist Hospital Adult and Pediatric Blood and Marrow Stem Cell Transplant Program

paulshaughnessyMethodist Hospital is proud to announce that Paul Shaughnessy, M.D., has been appointed as Medical Director of the Adult and Pediatric Blood and Marrow Stem Cell Transplant Program at Methodist Hospital in San Antonio, TX.

The Adult Blood and Marrow Stem Cell Transplant Program is one of the most preferred programs in the United States and consistently ranks among the nation’s top transplant centers in one-year patient survival rates.

Additionally, the Pediatric Blood and Marrow Stem Cell Transplant Program is one of the busiest programs in the nation – performing 40 to 50 pediatric blood and marrow stem cell transplants every year.

A physician who closely follows his transplant patients through their journey with cancer, Dr. Shaughnessy leads both adult and pediatric programs that engage in clinical trials to explore the latest therapies for a wide range of diseases.

“Bone marrow transplant allows that great interaction between caring for patients and solving complex clinical problems to improve outcomes in patients with hematological malignancies and those experiencing complications of bone marrow transplant,” said Dr. Shaughnessy.

Dr. Shaughnessy received a medical degree from Indiana University School of Medicine and is board certified in internal medicine, hematology and oncology. He completed his internship and residency in internal medicine at Wilford Hall Medical Center at Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. Additionally, Dr. Shaughnessy completed a fellowship in hematology-medical oncology also at Wilford Hall Medical Center.

For more information, visit www.SAHealth.com/pediatricbmt or www.SAHealth.com/adultbmt.

Cord Blood Transplant Saves Jathan’s Life

cord-bloodHealthcare workers from Methodist Hospital and GenCure’s Cord Blood Center wiped tears from their eyes as 16-year-old Jathan Rivas shared how a cord blood transplant saved his life. Jathan was diagnosed with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia in 2014, a quick-spreading blood cancer that was not responding to chemotherapy. The teenager received a cord blood transplant in August 2014. Without it, the disease would have been fatal. Cord blood is found in the placenta after a baby is born and is a rich source of stem cells that can be used to treat life-threatening diseases. Jathan’s shared his story at an event marking the 10-year anniversary of Methodist Hospital and Methodist Children’s Hospital, a campus of Methodist Hospital, participating in cord blood donation through GenCure’s Cord Blood Center, and July is National Cord Blood Awareness Month.

“Ten years ago, cord blood was a life-saving treatment for a handful of diseases,” said Troy Quigg, D.O., pediatric hematologist-oncologist at the Children’s Cancer and Blood Center, a department of Methodist Hospital, and Jathan’s doctor. “Today it is used to treat leukemia, blood disorders, deficiencies of the immune system, cancers, arthritis, heart disease, diabetes and neurological conditions, such as stroke.”

San Antonio Express-News Readers’ Choice: Best Hospital

Thank You, San Antonio!

Thank you, again, San Antonio! For the seventh year in a row you’ve voted us “Best Hospital,” through the Express-News Readers’ Choice Awards. We didn’t just win an award, we retained your trust. Every day our passion and professionalism is directed to healing our patients and supporting the families of this great city. We pledge to never take your trust lightly, and we promise to always uphold our mission of serving humanity to honor God while providing exceptional and cost-effective health care accessible to all.

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Miracle Liver Transplant Saves Mother and Child

frances-liver-transplantFrancis Ramos, 21, was excited about being a mom. She received prenatal care in her hometown of Harlingen and was eager to welcome her first baby into the world. But at 26 weeks pregnant, something wasn’t quite right. Francis had developed jaundice and markedly elevated liver enzymes which quickly turned to confusion and a coma. Her liver was failing.

She was transported to Methodist Specialty and Transplant Hospital, first by helicopter and then by ambulance, from Valley Baptist Hospital in Harlingen, TX. Preston Foster, MD, FACS, surgical director of the liver disease and transplant program at the Texas Transplant Institute at Methodist Speciality and Transplant Hospital, said that tests did not indicate the specific cause of Francis’ liver failure, which is often the case. “With acute liver failure, a person can be fine one week and near death the next,” he says.

FIGHTING FOR TWO LIVES The only hope for Francis and her baby was a high-risk liver transplant. Within 36 hours of admission, Francis was placed on the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) liver location waiting list at the highest status, giving her access to organs from Texas and Oklahoma. “Dr. Foster told me that my liver was completely gone and I had 48 hours to live unless a donor liver was located,” Francis said. “Luckily, 72 hours passed, and I was still fighting.” Then she went into a deep coma.

“We decided to perform a C-section delivery when the donor organ was on the way back from procurement and then complete the liver transplant,” Foster said. The medical team was on standby, and when the organ arrived, both surgeries were performed at Methodist Hospital in the hybrid operating room. It was critical that the specialized team had the ability to perform the transplant and C-section without transferring Francis to another facility. Lamar J. Albritton, MD, an obstetrician-gynecologist experienced in high-risk pregnancies and a member of the maternal transport team at Methodist Hospital, delivered the baby. “Many meetings and a lot of coordination was involved,” he says. “The entire operation took 8 hours.”

REASON TO CELEBRATE On Jan. 17, Max Joseph Ramos was born, weighing 1 pound 13½ ounces, and also that day, his mom got a second chance at life with her new liver. Max was in the newborn intensive care unit for 2½ months, and he came through without any medical issues. His mom was released to her family just 14 days after her transplant, several months earlier than expected. Today, their case remains unprecedented and is considered a medical miracle.

MethodistDonateLife.com: You Have the Power to Save a Life

donate-life-newsYou have the power to save a life. 

According to the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS), there are more than 123,000 individuals waiting for organs in the United States, including an estimated 13,000 in Texas. The need for donors is far greater than the number of people who actually donate. Becoming an organ donor is free, there is no cost to become a registered organ donor.

We are excited to announce that we successfully kicked off our 5,000 for 5,000 Organ Donor initiative, last month at the Capitol! A team from Methodist Heart Hospital and Methodist Specialty and Transplant Hospital, campuses of Methodist Hospital, were honored by San Antonio Senator, Jose Menendez. Also pictured is heart/kidney transplant patient, Earl Taylor (center).

In commemoration of Methodist reaching 5,000 transplants among our combined solid organ programs, we have the goal of adding 5,000 additional donors to the Texas donor list from mid-April through the end of the year.

 

Join our 5,000 for 5,000 by visiting MethodistDonateLife.com and register today!

Dr. Paul Shaughnessy and Dr. Marsha Kinney Visit Washington DC to Discuss Oral Oncology Parity Laws

Washington-DC-newsDr. Paul Shaughnessy, Adult Blood and Marrow Stem Cell Transplant Physician at Methodist Hospital, and Dr. Marsha Kinney were honored to represent the American Society of Hematology in Washington DC earlier this week. They met with Congressman William Hurd, as well as staff members from the offices of Senator Ted Cruz and Representative Lamar Smith, to discuss Oral Oncology Parity Laws and advocate for patients who have to pay large co-payments for their anti-cancer oral therapy.

Oral Oncology Parity Laws can assist patients in accessing innovative medications that directly attack cancer cells. Often IV administered therapies are offered at a much lower out-of-pocket cost to patients than anti-cancer medications. These laws push to equalize out-of-pocket costs between oral and IV therapies.

Learn more about Methodist Healthcare Cancer Services by visiting www.MethodistCancerServices.com. Methodist Healthcare is a leading provider of cancer services in South Texas and a proud partner of Sarah Cannon Research Institute (tag SarahCannon.com).

Photo: Dr. Paul Shaughnessy (right) Dr. Marsha Kinney (left) Congressman William Hurd (center)